0 0 0 0 0
Raccoon
Raccoons are easy to recognize with their distinctive black mask and ringed tail. Adults mature in about a year, and larger animals may eventually reach weights of more than 30 pounds. Raccoons mate in late winter and after a 62 day gestation period they give birth to between 2 and 6 babies called cubs. The two illnesses most commonly associated with raccoons are distemper and rabies. They also carry what is called Raccoon ring worm. Raccoons are excellent climbers and are very dexterous. A raccoon's fingers are almost as numble as a monkey's and they aide this creature in opening trash cans and boxes, and in disassembling building structures in order to find habitat. They are most active at night, seeking refuge during the daylight hours in hollow trees, dense vegetation, barns, chimneys, crawl spaces, walls, and attics. They are omnivores, and will feed on almost anything they can get their hands on. They are generally talented and intelligent, and live very well in conjunction with people.

Captured Racoons and Racoon Damage (Click on image to expand)

Six Captured Raccoons
Captured Raccoon
Attic Droppings
Chimney Raccoons

Relocated Raccoon with Cubs

Relocated Raccoon with Cubs

In this difficult relocation process, location and many years of experience are very important.

Squirrel
Squirrels are members of the rodent family. The most frequently dealt with nuisance squirrel is the Eastern Gray Squirrel and Fox Squirrel. Squirrels are active year-round and arboreal, meaning that they live primarily in trees. They feed on a great variety of foods, such as nuts, seeds, fungi, fruits, and of course the seed in your birdfeeder. They store nuts and acorns in holes in the ground. Squirrels breed primarily in late winter and early spring. After about six weeks 2 to 5 young are born, and raised in a nest for about three months. They prefer cavities in trees (or homes), and when cavities aren't available, they will build a nest out of leaves and twigs high in a tree.

Captured Squirrels and Squirrel Damage (Click on image to expand)

Squirrel Damage
Captured Squirrels
Squirrel Damage
Squirrel Attic Nest

Red Fox
Red foxes live around the world in many diverse habitats including forests, grasslands, mountains, and deserts. They also adapt well to human environments such as farms, suburban areas, and even large communities. Red foxes are solitary hunters who feed on rodents, rabbits, birds, and other small game but their diet can be as flexible as their home habitat. Foxes will also eat fruit and vegetables, fish, frogs, and insects. If living among humans, foxes have been seen dinning on garbage and pet food. In winter, foxes meet to mate. The vixen (female) typically gives birth to a litter of 2 to 12 pups. Both parents care for their young through the summer before they are able to strike out on their own in the fall.

Captured Red Fox and Red Fox Damage (Click on image to expand)

Red Fox
Captured Red Fox
Captured Red Fox
Captured Red Fox

Coyote
Coyotes are very adaptable and inhabit most areas of the state. The adult Coyote weighs between 25 to 35 pounds on average with a lifespan up to 15 years in the wild. Coyotes are very active in search of food and mates during the late winter to early spring months. After a 63 to 65 day gestation period females den and give birth to litters of three to nine pups, usually in April or May. During the time of the year when adult coyotes are caring for young they can be very aggressive. Although the coyote has been observed killing sheep, poultry and other livestock, in addition to smaller family pets it does not subsist on domestic animals. Food habit studies reveal that its principle diet is composed of deer, mice, rabbits, ground squirrels and other small rodents, insects, even reptiles, along with fruits and berries of wild plants.

Coyote Pictures (Click on image to expand)

Coyote
Coyote

Skunk
Skunks are easy to recognize with their bold black and white coloring. While most animals prefer camouflage, a skunk's distinctive coloration serves as a warning of its potent attack. Using special glands below the tail, skunks can spray their powerful scent up to 15 feet. This scent burns an attacker's eyes, and causes temporary blindness. Of course, the stench is too much for most animals to bear, and serves as a strong warning against future attacks. Adult skunks grow to about 22-30 inches and 8-12 pounds. Skunks mate during March and after a gestation period of about 64 days they give birth to between 4 and 8 babies called kits. Skunks are primarily nocturnal. Skunks are omnivores, and will feed on almost anything, including small rodents, worms, insects, grubs, carrion, fruit, garbage, and pet food.

Captured Skunks and Skunk Damage (Click on image to expand)

Captured Skunk
Skunk Entry Point
Captured Skunk
Skunk Entry Point

Opossum
Opossums are the only North American marsupials. The females of this group typically have a pouch on the belly where the young are carried and nourished for a time after their birth. Opossums have a very short gestation period of only 13 days after which they give birth to between 8 and 15 babies called joeys, of these only 8 or 9 survive. Opossums are 2-3 feet long including the tail, and weighs 8-14 pounds as adults. They live in a variety of habitats. They are famous for their prehensile tail, which they use for balance and grasping, and can occasionally hang from. They are also known for Ňplaying opossumÓ, a defense tactic of mimicking death when frightened. The opossum is a nocturnal animal, and will eat almost anything, including insects, snails, rodents, berries, fruit, grasses, leaves, carrion, pet food, and garbage. They prefer meat to vegetables.

Captured Opossums and Opossum Damage (Click on image to expand)

Captured Opossum
Captured Opossum

Woodchuck / Groundhog
Woodchucks are not large, but theyŐre powerful tunnelers. Their husky bodies measure 16-20 inches long, excluding their dark, bushy tails. They weigh 5 to 15 pounds; and their coarse, brown fur is sprinkled with gray. Strong and active, woodchucks can swim, climb trees, and dig amazing burrow systems, some as deep as 5 feet and as long as 30 feet, with multiple tunnels and chambers. Woodchucks hibernate from October through February, so they can eat heavily during the fall, sometimes doubling their weight. During hibernation, their body temperature drops 40 degrees and their hearts beat only 4 to 10 times per minute. When they awaken, they immediately begin eating, and the mating season commences as soon as they have regained their strength. After a 30-dat gestation period, a litter of 4 to 6 young is born and then nursed for 6 weeks. By late summer, young woodchucks are ready to live on their own.

Captured Woodchucks and Woodchuck Damage (Click on image to expand)

Captured Woodchuck
Captured Woodchuck

Pigeon
Pigeons have adapted well to urban environments. Most cities are full of flocks of these birds, just looking for handouts. They often associate humans with food, and are unafraid to flock closely to people. They are also unafraid to leave droppings everywhere (cars are obviously preferred spots), along with nesting material. The nesting material can clog vents and drain pipes, and cause potential fire hazards. The droppings and feathers can contaminate vents of buildings, as well as food destined for human consumption. Pigeons can carry or transmit numerous diseases. Pigeons also contain parasites including a number of bugs, fleas, ticks and mites.